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Bon Trails

Dear Lew,

Thank you for sharing the photos with us Lew, but you WILL be with us tomorrow, in our hearts!We will miss you and know you will join us again just as soon as you can.
All the Best and take it easy,
Rowena

On Sun, Mar 4, 2018 at 6:16 PM, Lew Z <l.zuelow> wrote:

Hi Everyone, As you know, we “enjoy” sharing what’s gone on in our lives at the start of the hiking seasons circling our wagons. Since I won’t be able to share this moment with you tomorrow, I thought you might enjoy some previous circles – like a “wheel in a wheel way up in the middle of the air”. You might try the pics on your desktops for a big picture. Hugs, Lew Zuelow (alias Lew or Z or LewZ)

Mt. Wittenberg, March 7, 2011

Mt. Tam, Rock Springs, March 5, 2012

Roy’s Redwoods, March 6, 2017 (Note the much debated golf course in the photo, I don’t recall anything that has been discussed this much in the Marin Independent Journal.) https://www.ptreyeslight.com/article/valley-residents-sue-over-golf-course-process
http://www.marinij.com/environment-and-nature/20171224/marin-to-seek-interim-golf-course-operator-in-san-geronimo

See you a bit later, “happy trails”. Z

Thanks to Chris Jones for the photo

Bon Trails

Great photos, Lew! We’ll miss you.

On Mar 4, 2018, at 6:16 PM, Lew Z <l.zuelow> wrote:

Hi Everyone, As you know, we “enjoy” sharing what’s gone on in our lives at the start of the hiking seasons circling our wagons. Since I won’t be able to share this moment with you tomorrow, I thought you might enjoy some previous circles – like a “wheel in a wheel way up in the middle of the air”. You might try the pics on your desktops for a big picture. Hugs, Lew Zuelow (alias Lew or Z or LewZ)

Mt. Wittenberg, March 7, 2011

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Mt. Tam, Rock Springs, March 5, 2012

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Roy’s Redwoods, March 6, 2017 (Note the much debated golf course in the photo, I don’t recall anything that has been discussed this much in the Marin Independent Journal.) https://www.ptreyeslight.com/article/valley-residents-sue-over-golf-course-process
http://www.marinij.com/environment-and-nature/20171224/marin-to-seek-interim-golf-course-operator-in-san-geronimo

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See you a bit later, “happy trails”. Z

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Thanks to Chris Jones for the photo

Bon Trails

Hi Everyone, As you know, we “enjoy” sharing what’s gone on in our lives at the start of the hiking seasons circling our wagons. Since I won’t be able to share this moment with you tomorrow, I thought you might enjoy some previous circles – like a “wheel in a wheel way up in the middle of the air”. You might try the pics on your desktops for a big picture. Hugs, Lew Zuelow (alias Lew or Z or LewZ)

Mt. Wittenberg, March 7, 2011

Mt. Tam, Rock Springs, March 5, 2012

Roy’s Redwoods, March 6, 2017 (Note the much debated golf course in the photo, I don’t recall anything that has been discussed this much in the Marin Independent Journal.) https://www.ptreyeslight.com/article/valley-residents-sue-over-golf-course-process
http://www.marinij.com/environment-and-nature/20171224/marin-to-seek-interim-golf-course-operator-in-san-geronimo

See you a bit later, “happy trails”. Z

Thanks to Chris Jones for the photo

Bon Trails

Hi Everyone, As you know, we “enjoy” sharing what’s gone on in our lives at the start of the hiking seasons circling our wagons. Since I won’t be able to share this moment with you tomorrow, I thought you might enjoy some previous circles – like a “wheel in a wheel way up in the middle of the air”. You might try the pics on your desktops for a big picture. Hugs, Lew Zuelow (alias Lew or Z or LewZ)

Mt. Wittenberg, March 7, 2011

Mt. Tam, Rock Springs, March 5, 2012

Roy’s Redwoods, March 6, 2017 (Note the much debated golf course in the photo, I don’t recall anything that has been discussed this much in the Marin Independent Journal.) https://www.ptreyeslight.com/article/valley-residents-sue-over-golf-course-process
http://www.marinij.com/environment-and-nature/20171224/marin-to-seek-interim-golf-course-operator-in-san-geronimo

See you a bit later, “happy trails”. Z

Thanks to Chris Jones for the photo

Thanks much for NYC 1911!!

Hello Everyone, This is a forward to my hike leader and friend Michael Ellis who sent one of his occasional newsletters today which I’m much enjoying. I wrote in response to a couple of links he sent: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-vMdR3sxe8 https://la.curbed.com/2017/11/21/16643502/reasons-to-love-los-angeles#nws=mcnewsletter

and this articulate paragraph:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/01/opinion/trump-national-monuments-bears-ears.html?
“…The president is expected to travel to Utah on Monday to announce that he is repealing protections for as many as two million acres of public land in the American West, an area more than six times the size of Grand Teton National Park, including vast portions of two national monuments in the state, Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante.
Mr. Trump’s plans add up to the largest elimination of protected areas in American history. He is a vandal in our midst, coming in person to lay waste to the land. This theft of our heritage should awaken us to the damage being piled up across our public lands under this administration…”

https://suwa.org/conservation-groups-file-lawsuit-president-trump-illegally-axed-dinosaur-treasure-grand-staircase-escalante-national-monument/

But amid all this darkness I’m sending all of you hugs and hurrahs for the sunshine (albeit chilly) of this new day, Love, Lew

======================================

Thanks much for NYC 1911!!

Dear Michael,

Love the historic stuff as you know and the footage here with the music was remarkable. Also the link from Curbed LA which I sent to my daughter Kyrie. She works at UCLA and had been assigned to the emergency center there this past week. The Skirball Fire was close to campus but when some Bel Air mansions went up they poured even more support into that area.

Thought all of the special stuff about LA was perfect antidote right now from Curbed LA.

I’m back home from Kaiser Hospital last Friday with my son Darrin driving and Pat riding shotgun – Pat at shotgun somehow doesn’t work! Feeling a bit better but two surgeries to recover from is efficient but seems to take twice as much energy so it’s a slow go. Just finished the first parastomal hernia repair last week which was in emergency mode when a week later had a second emergency with repair of my groin hernia. Hopefully these nemeses are now handled and healing. The emergency part of this gives way to slow and steady improvement. I feel a bit like I’ve been riding around the streets of Paris in one of those Euro ambulances sirening with that up and down pitch echoing out into the world.

Get my staples out next Thursday and a progress report from my cool surgeon, Dr. Novich. Tempting to call him “Dr. No” but he’s been anything but being decisive, timely and very skillful – just the kind of pilot you want in a storm.

Thanks again for the meaty email. I’m told I need lots of protein.

Love to you and to you all from this street corner of life. Better go back to hawking a few newspapers.

Hugs, Lew

P.S. Loved that paragraph on Bears Ears

I’ll also try to forward this email response to the group so sorry for any duplication.

Lynch Canyon with Michael – 6 November 2017

Driving the water level route on Highway 37 often means a traffic jam but at 9 AM on a Monday morning it was “anything but”. There was a surrounding sense of the greater San Francisco Bay heightened by old farming levees coming down in the process of reclaiming the bay.
Returning the tidal baylands to their original buffer role between water and land is preparation for rising sea levels in the not so far future.
Added to this there is the remarkable beauty of this scene as you drive by with shorebirds and migrants just outside your window. This view was
only heightened by a hovering white-tailed kite, the slow circling of a flock of white pelicans riding a thermal high into the sky and a beautiful array
of surrounding clouds highlighted by the sunshine. http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/white-tailed-kite

I recalled Cunard Line’s 1952 advertising slogan, “Getting there is half the fun”. This was a bold but late attempt to appeal to traveler’s by promoting relaxed travel of ship. The airlines were about to take market share but these last years of going to sea to get somewhere was still a shining moment in travel history filled with many comforts, luxuries and maybe even a ship board romance. First out of the gate British Overseas Airways (BOAC) began its DeHavilland Comet 1 jet service between London and Johannesburg in May of 1952. Determined to maintain their lead in spite of accidents grounding the Comet 1, BOAC “inaugurated its .. weekly transatlantic service on 4 October 1958 with the new Comet 4. Pan Am Clippers were soon to begin their new era of jet travel with the Boeing 707. On 26 October1958, Pan Am inaugurated its first 707 daily transatlantic service from New York to Paris shrinking travel time and offering “Only seven hours to brush up on your French.”

http://quirkyberkeley.com/getting-there-is-half-the-fun/ This unique and rich website is a trove for all things Berkeley. The particular link has assembled a splendid series of Cunard travel posters about “getting there is half the fun.”
http://www.boeing.com/news/frontiers/archive/2008/july/i_history.pdf
https://matadornetwork.com/bnt/50-most-inspiring-travel-quotes-of-all-time/

You may recall our last visit to Solano County Parks on our hike at Rush Ranch in December of 2016 or at least recall our star Dalmatian actor, a
Stonewall Sport Horse. http://stonewallsporthorse.org

We talked at the time of other Solano County Parks and got our chance to explore a new one on this hike at Lynch Canyon. Solano County was named after a famous Native American Chief of the Patwin, a word meaning people. He was a friend of Mariano Vallejo and an ally of his in conflicts with other tribal groups in the area. His native name was Set-Yeto meaning “brave or fierce hand” and his baptized Christian name was, Francisco Solano. In addition to being a charismatic leader “one of his most striking and imposing characteristics was his height, topping off at 6 feet and 7 inches.”
http://www.sonomasun.com/2009/09/18/patwin-chief-solano/ http://bellavistaranch.net/suisun_history/chief_solano-bowen.html
http://www.co.solano.ca.us/depts/rm/countypark/lynchcyn.asp

Gathering at the parking area a dramatic hill sets the scene as does the welcome rest room after out travels. You can spot a few black dots on the hill – Black Angus cattle keeping down the grass. They seem content with more solitary work.

Gathering at an information sign we read that Lynch is home to golden eagles and hawks as well as being a magnet for migrating and over-wintering birds of prey providing “over 1,000 undeveloped acres where they can hunt and rest.” http://www.solanolandtrust.org/raptors.aspx

Michael noticed some Northern California black walnut trees. In agriculture they are used as root stock for the tastier English walnuts which are grafted on top of the black walnut root ball. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juglans_hindsii http://calscape.org/Juglans-californica-() this description of the Southern California Black Walnut relates that the Chumash Indians of the Channel Islands eat the nuts.
http://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/columnists/bill-pramuk/in-search-of-big-black-walnut-trees/article_7e66165f-73c2-51d9-a335-2b08aee5cc4b.html – If you can stand the advertising, this is an interesting article about some special black walnut trees in the Napa Valley area from an article in the Napa Valley Register by Bill Pramuk in 2009. They were found just across the Napa County Line in Lake County on a UC research station at the Donald and Sylvia McLaughlin Preserve in Pope Valley.

Michael points out a bluebird house or better “nesting boxes” which have been constructed by local cub scout troops and the Napa-Solano Audubon Society. The location and design of the box are as crucial as its location. The hole needs to accommodate the particular bird size. If it is too large it would allow starlings to take it over destroying the fledge of the desired birds: western bluebirds, tree swallows, house wrens and a few others.
In placing a box, crews face it to the east or south away from prevailing winds, the round entry holes measure 1 & 9/16ths of an inch, six inches from the bottom of the hole to the box floor. “If the box is too shallow, predators can reach the chicks. If it’s too deep, the chicks can’t crawl out. To make the box just right, the box builders carve little grooves on the inside for the chicks to stepladder their way out.”
https://baynature.org/article/a-helping-hand-for-bluebirds/

Spotting a ……?

The sign urges us to resist the urge to pet a cow, hadn’t seen this one before. Getting between a cow and her calf could be problematic and dangerous.

Solitary and substantial black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populus_trichocarpa Or it might also be a Fremont’s cottonwood, Populus fremontii, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populus_fremontii
https://sites.google.com/site/ezillmer/home/cottonwood_fluff

High wires keeping up the clouds

Michael spots two Golden Eagles, one mature and one immature, on the horizon with a white cloud helping as background.
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Golden_Eagle/id http://www.water.ca.gov/suisun/dataReports/docs/SEW/geagle.cfm
https://abcbirds.org/bird/golden-eagle/ http://ca.audubon.org/birds-0/golden-eagle

Topping another rise we looked way up a hill to an object of interest, that dark spot on the crest. The cattle perform a valuable service keeping down the grass as well as enjoying the forage. She’s enjoying a view from close to 900 feet with “panoramic views extending from the Coast Range to San Francisco Bay and across the Delta to the Sierra Nevada”. https://baynature.org/event/mid-week-hike-at-lynch-canyon/

Lynch Canyon Reservoir provides habitat for many waterbirds both locals and those migrating through, a great white egret can be spotted in the center. In the foreground is a border of tule grass which was used by the California Indians to make “shelters, boats and sleeping & sitting mats”.
http://www.cabrillo.edu/~crsmith/tule.html http://wpn.org/wpn/tuleboat.htm
https://www.livescience.com/46121-california-tule-fog.html from 2014 Tule fog can transform the Central Valley of California and make the roadways a gamble with markers at the side of the road your only guide.

Michael makes an explanation with hands added for emphasis, what does his body language tell us?

Heading uphill to take the high path so we can “get to Scotland afore ye” or at least to our lunch spot with everyone else. Harriet leads the way.

Michael mentioned that some animals like to leave their scat atop cow paddies, all sorts of signatures out there.
http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/November-2016-Animal-scat.pdf

And a purple star thistle in bloom as well as we continue up the hill, there is also one with a yellow flower called a golden star thistle.  The lancing thorns and the delicate bloom provide a vivid contrast.
http://wric.ucdavis.edu/information/natural%20areas/wr_C/Centaurea_calcitrapa-iberica.pdf

Lunch atop the rise: Michael loves Halloween and he shared some of this year’s celebration on McDonald Avenue in Santa Rosa at lunch.
The owners of the McDonald Mansion, the John Webleys, decided that a celebration this year after the recent devastating fires would be a nice respite, a healing time and a welcome back to normalcy for everyone and especially the kids. This year there was a crashed spaceship in their front yard, a cafe in Roswell, N.M and live music. Michael went as the Disco King and rode his bike over hanging a disco ball from the handlebars with a boom box accompaniment.
He’d met a lady from Israel, Ellen, giving her a ride on the way back from Burning Man. They hit it off, she’s a spinner – you’ll recall Michael’s love of hula hooping. Ellen and her friend Issac came by on this scene and Michael gave them a grand tour of an American Halloween. They joined him trick or treating and got a royal welcome at all the houses since Michael is a well known participant in this celebration. The next day they were off home to Israel.

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/gallery/4588613-181/story.html?artslide=0 Some shots of the McDonald Mansion through the years with a few photos of Halloween through the years toward the end of the series.

We find a fascinating and beautiful thistle as we head down the hill after lunch. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardoon
http://www.incrediblevegetables.co.uk/how-to-grow-cardoons/ http://www.bestofsicily.com/mag/art332.htm

There were remarkably few rocky outcroppings on these hills. Here Michael finds some weathered sandstone. In “Roadside Geology of Northern and Central California”, the authors describe this area’s geology: “The highway (I 80) passes through a spectacular road cut in Franciscan rocks at the top of Sulphur Springs Mountain, just east of Vallejo. Basically similar Franciscan rocks form the hills north of the highway between San Francisco and Vacaville, where the highway passes the southern ends of several long ridges and wide valleys that extend to the northern horizon. These are slices of the Coast Range that moved horizontally along faults parallel to the San Andreas Fault.” P.271

Armand talks to a Solano Land Trust Volunteer at Lynch Canyon, Jeff Bonneville, who has the Disneyesque title of “Bluebird Monitor”. Michael greeted him warmly and Jeff shared an array of interesting information about the nesting box program.

 

Clip42
https://vimeo.com/242121099
Anyone

Heading back, following the clouds home.

P.S. Last week I misidentified a Bald Cypress for a Dawn Redwood on our Golden Gate Park hike. Here’s are three youtube videos which give some helpful, basic information about both: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gIlu0I3Pulw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19Jyp6CxA7A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHnge34PytI

P.P.S. I discovered this helpful link on the WordPress site which organizes some of my more recent hike-logs (as well as many other blogs) with select photos and introductory sentences as well – a nice diving board. https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/18737942

Tilting at Windmills in San Francisco – 30 October 2017

Golden Gate Park is a mecca for people and nature in the heart of San Francisco. Wrested from the sand dunes starting in 1870, this precious green space provides a haven for city dwellers, tourists and is a special destination for Bay Area residents. From the Wikipedia entry: “It is over three miles (4.8km) long east to west, and about half a mile (0.8) north to south. With 13 million visitors annually, Golden Gate is the fifth most-visited city park in the United States . .”. We’ve enjoyed hiking here with Don McLaurin, our friend who is a City Guide, in the Panhandle and the eastern section of the park in recent past hikes. Michael surmised this western part of the park was last visited by our Footloose group “ . . about 15 years ago.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Gate_Park

We gather for the hike circling up for instructions – we might have looked like this 60 years ago plus or minus! Many classes and school groups are always out and about in the park enjoying the mysterious pathways filled with fascinating discoveries. Our hikes all have special highlights but this one especially seemed like a “Pictures at an Exhibition” experience with focus moments followed by a promenade to the next frame.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mdkp7YBB-zU&app=desktop This is a remarkable series with at least 7 parts on a variety of local subjects. These “lymarchvideos” by Glenn Robert Lym who is an A.I.A. Architect open up a fascinating window to San Francisco history, carefully researched and presented with sensitivity and style.This one is HERE2 – A History of Golden Gate Park.

Harriet, stylin’ for the day, sets the tone for our ramble with some autumn colors in a bow to the east coast and her cherished Baltimore.

Michael talks to us by the Buffalo Paddock about the history of the North American Bison species.

https://vimeo.com/241415036 https://vimeo.com/241415726

https://ww2.kqed.org/news/2017/06/08/whats-with-the-bison-in-golden-gate-park/ https://goldengatepark.com/buffalo-paddock.html
https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/bison.htm excellent narrated video set in Yellowstone Park
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/where-the-buffalo-no-longer-roamed-3067904/

Barb suggested that we explore the casting pools which were just across the way from the buffalo paddock – a new island in our voyage of discovery. Along with three casting pools there is “a rustic mountain-style lodge, home of the Golden Gate Angling and Casting Club where generations of San Franciscans have learned to fly fish. The lodge was organized in 1933, as an offshoot of the San Francisco Fly Casting Club, which dates back to 1894.” https://goldengatepark.com/anglers-lodge.html Dropping the fly in the target circle was amazing to watch.

A member of the club, Victor Lee, spoke to us enthusiastically about their history and the opportunities offered here. At the end of his comments he was talking about the Spey Casting technique used in fly fishing and fly fishing competitions, a name that comes from the River Spey in Scotland. https://vimeo.com/241416619    https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-adk-adk_sbnt&hsimp=yhs-adk_sbnt&hspart=adk&p=shortspey+casting+video+clips#id=9&vid=8481fe

http://www.ggacc.org/Spey-O-Rama-2017

New Zealand Tea Tree or Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) contorts beautifully along our path. Manuka is a Maori word for Leptospermum scoparium and the name of a coveted honey. On Captain Cook’s arrival in New Zealand in 1769 his crew boiled the leaves of the Manuka to make tea.

https://meaningoftrees.com/2013/07/24/manuka-leptospermum-scoparium/ This artful, well written and illustrated link details 18 other New Zealand trees as well.

http://www.boethingtreeland.com/leptospermum-scoparium-helene-strybing.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptospermum_scoparium

A shady grove with a stream on our right as we promenade two legs and four. The Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra is conducted by Valery Gerfiev playing the Promenade (part 1) by Modest Mussorgsky: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5r8sa863Ts

Mallards to the right of us: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/id http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/mallard

Michael pointed out a Dawn Redwood which unlike other Redwoods is a deciduous tree. It was discovered in China relatively recently – in 1943 during WW2.
http://www.quarryhillbg.org/home/quarryhill/The%20Dawn%20Redwood.pdf
http://peabody.yale.edu/exhibits/dawn-redwood http://dawnredwood.org/HISTORY.htm

Nearby Michael spotted an American Chestnut tree. Here’s an American Chestnut Leaf, burr and nut. You can see the leaf is toothed as its Castanea dentata Latin name indicates. From the Wiki entry it was “a large, monoecious deciduous tree of the beech family native to eastern North America. It was one of the most important forest trees throughout its range, and was considered the finest chestnut tree in the world. It is estimated that between 3 and 4 billion American chestnut trees were destroyed in the first half of the 20th century by blight after its initial discovery in 1904.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_chestnut

From The American Chestnut Foundation site: https://www.acf.org/the-american-chestnut/
https://www.acf.org/the-american-chestnut/history-american-chestnut/ – Don’t miss the video which is a remarkable piece of Americana nor be put off by its 27:37 minute length. There are interviews with many people of the Appalachians who have lived with and love the American Chestnut tree. The language immerses you beautifully into their culture.

As advertised, a windmill looms at last. This is the first windmill constructed to pump water to the growing Golden Gate Park in 1902, called the Dutch Windmill. https://noehill.com/sf/landmarks/sf147.asp
http://hoodline.com/2017/03/getting-to-know-golden-gate-park-s-elusive-windmills
https://goldengatepark.com/windmills.html and this one to satisfy your engineering instincts http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist/wmill.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFcnF1yS4o4&app=desktop This brief video gives you a good idea of how the windmill works, this one from Derbyshire, UK was built in 1797 and restored in 2002. http://www.heagewindmill.org.uk/ Sorry, it feels un-Dutch to feature an English windmill but they had the best brief video.

http://www.indepthinfo.com/windmills/history.htm Here’s a brief windmill history from which we learn that our Dutch windmill is a smock mill allowing just the top part of the windmill to be turned to face the wind. “This was a vast improvement as it was lighter and easier to turn. More permanent structures could be built to house the mill beneath. Brick and stone towers developed from this innovation.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_wind_power More detailed going back to the beginnings of wind power though not quite as far back as the discovery of fire. Whether grinding grain or pumping water, the windmill was a technological marvel of its time and continues its remarkable history today. This extensive link takes us up from ancient history to wind turbines of the present day.

The displays of tulips at the Dutch Windmill are an exciting destination in San Francisco from mid-March to mid-April. In fact, they are part and parcel of the Dutch Windmill’s identity today. http://www.hiddensf.com/420a-dutch-windmill-tulip-garden-sf.html

Crossing JF Kennedy Drive at Ocean Beach

Scott reads a memorial plaque about Roald Amundsen (1872-1928) to the group. He was a remarkable Norwegian explorer of the early 20th century who arrived to a hero’s welcome in an earthquake ravaged San Francisco on October 19, 1906. He and his crew had just successfully completed a three year Northwest Passage voyage traveling from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean over the North Pole. They sailed into San Francisco Bay on their ship the Gjoa. The name means “god” and “beautiful” in Norse and is pronounced simply as “Joe”. The Norwegian American community sought to buy the ship from him. He didn’t want to sail back home around the Horn and so pleased them when he donated it to the city of San Francisco. The ship was “dragged up on the beach to the Northwest corner of Golden Gate Park where it became a display. It deteriorated through the years and repairs were postponed by WW 2. Finally in 1972, it was returned to Norway where it was lovingly rebuilt and restored. It remains honored in a separate building of the Fran Museum in Oslo.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gjøa http://www.outsidelands.org/gjoa.php http://www.artandarchitecture-sf.com/tag/roald-amundsen

Amundsen went on to the hero’s life after completing the Northwest passage, becoming the first to cross the Arctic by air and also the first to reach the South Pole. This was a memorable competition with Great Britain’s Robert Falcon Scott in which Scott and his companions perished. Amundsen “was one of the greatest figures in the field of polar exploration.” https://www.britannica.com/biography/Roald-Amundsen

We break for lunch in the garden behind the Beach Chalet .http://sfrecpark.org/destination/golden-gate-park/beach-chalet/

And Louise’s dogs take the opportunity to relax being dog tired.

The murals, mosaics and wood carvings on the ground floor of the Beach Chalet building were a 1936-37 project funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA). The frescoes were done by the French-born painter Lucien Labaudt. “The images depict residents at play in Golden Gate Park and Land’s End during that time. Labaudt recruited friends and family as models, but several well known figures are included, among them legendary Golden Gate Park Superintendent John McLaren.” Here are some links to this “time capsule” of history.
http://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=Murals_at_the_Beach_Chalet
https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/beach-chalet-wpa-murals
https://noehill.com/sf/landmarks/nat1981000172.asp

We joust with the other windmill in the park that is also near the beach. It’s a bit more than quarter mile further south and is called “The Murphy Windmill”. It was a $20,000 gift to the city from a banker, Samuel G. Murphy. It was considered the largest in the world when it was completed in 1908. We’re beginning to have some sympathy now for Don Quixote riding against his nemeses astride faithful “Rosinante” along with his loyal companion Sancho Panza on his donkey “Dapple”. http://outsidelands.org/murphy_windmill.php https://noehill.com/sf/landmarks/sf210.asp https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/murphy-windmill https://inspiredimperfection.com/adventures/murphy-windmill-golden-gate-park/

Perhaps this was our “Great Gate Of Kiev” but we still needed to find our way back to Go . . . and home.

You have many choices on this Yahoo page, I chose the performance in the middle of the top row. From Radio-Television of Slovenia in Ljubljana Maestro En Shao leads the RTV SLO Orchestra.
https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-adk-adk_sbnt&hsimp=yhs-adk_sbnt&hspart=adk&p=great+gate+of+kiev#id=3&vid=bd64cdf4b7bc14

How to complete our circle? Scott, our urban pathfinder, studied a map of the crisscrossing pathways and mapped out our route back for which he received a hug from Michael and a smile from us all. He got us to the church on time.